Kim Jong-un snubs Donald Trump as North Korean leader eyes Putin alliance

Kim Jong-un snubs Donald Trump as North Korean leader eyes Putin alliance

Today marked ‘Liberation Day’ for the Korean peninsula as both North and South celebrated their freedom from Japanese occupation. Both Kim Jong-un

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Today marked ‘Liberation Day’ for the Korean peninsula as both North and South celebrated their freedom from Japanese occupation. Both Kim Jong-un and South Korean President Moon Jae-in used the occasion to deliver landmark announcements as the region looks set to achieve peace without Washington’s help. The former appeared to reject Trump’s diplomatic advances over the past year and instead grow closer to Putin, much to Washington’s dismay.

Kim said that relations between Russia and North Korea had entered “a new high stage”, according to state news agency KCNA.

He added that the two nations would increase their bilateral cooperations in the political and economic spheres.

Putin, meanwhile, said that the leaders’ improved relationship was clearly displayed by the Vladivistok summit in April.

The landmark meeting in Eastern Russia saw the two initially forge a closer bond amid Pyongyang’s growing nuclear tensions with Washington.

The move will likely be a shock to Trump, who was keen to remain in Kim’s good books following further peace talks in June.

The US President initially kicked off negotiations last March with the Singapore Summit and has gone on to curry Kim’s favour ever since with a series of meetings and positive rhetoric.

The North Korean boss also invoked the memories of World War 2 when referring to his Russian counterparts.

The Soviet Union – led by Joseph Stalin – came out on top in 1945 after a struggle against the Japanese.

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They supported them during the subsequent Korean War and until the dissolution of the Union.

While former President Boris Yeltsin withdrew support from the North – instead preferring to back the US-backed South – Putin’s election in 1999 warmed relations once again.

The pair’s comments came as South Korea President Moon vowed to achieve a United Korea by 2045.

He said: “This will probably constitute the most critical juncture in the entire process of achieving denuclearisation and establishing peace on the Korean peninsula.

“Now is the time for both Koreas and the United States to focus on resuming working-level negotiations … at the earliest possible date.

“A new Korean peninsula, one that will bring peace and prosperity to itself, east Asia and the world, awaits us.”

He also struck a diplomatic note towards Japan following weeks of rowing between the two old adversaries.

President Trump summed up the mood last week when he said: “South Korea and Japan are fighting all the time. They’re supposed to be allies.”

Mr Moon’s address urged Japan not to ruin the economic relationship that has enabled both countries to prosper.

He added: “Only when we work together will we be able to achieve joint growth that is sustainable.

“If Japan chooses the path of dialogue and cooperation, we will gladly join hands.”

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