Trump SPLIT: President's children Ivanka and Donald Jnr in huge row as family feud erupts

Trump SPLIT: President's children Ivanka and Donald Jnr in huge row as family feud erupts

Ivanka Trump and Donald Trump Jr. have taken opposing sides in the long-running debate. The family feud follows two deadly mass shooting in El Paso

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Ivanka Trump and Donald Trump Jr. have taken opposing sides in the long-running debate. The family feud follows two deadly mass shooting in El Paso and Dayton that killed 31 people and injured dozens more. Republican Senator Pat Toomey and Democratic Senator Joe Manchin are attempting to influence the President to support new gun control measures. The amendment would extend background checks to private firearms sales at gun shows and transactions via the internet.

Ivanka Trump, a supporter of tighter gun laws, braced the move on social media.

She uploaded a note on her Instagram story calling on Congress to “enact Red Flag laws/Extreme Risk Protection Orders in every state, increase resources dedicated to mental health support nationwide and close background check loopholes”.

She has also spoken to lawmakers on potential gun control legislation.

Among those contacted included Mr Manchin.

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Many are hopeful that Ivanka, who is a senior advisor at the White House, will positively influence the disparate atmosphere.

Her progression, though, may well be stopped in its tracks after her brother alerted the president to the consequences of extended background checks.

He forewarned the potential infringement on the civil liberties of gun owners and the potential hit it would have on the popularity of the Republican party.

The Wall Street Journal reported that Trump called his eldest son “my gun expert” at a recent fundraiser, saying ‘he knows more about guns than anyone I know.”

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President Trump was further warned by Wayne LaPierre, chief executive of the National Rifle Association, that extending background checks would ultimately cost him support.

A poll carried out Morning Consult and Politico, however, refuted these warnings.

Conducted after the shootings, the poll found that 90percent of self-identified Republicans, 2016 Trump voters, and those who held a favourable view of the president all supported mandatory background checks on all gun sales.

Several media sources have said White House are holding meetings with congressional aides to determine which legislation, if any, the White House should support.

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